Upcoming Events

July 2015

August 2015

  • Sunday, August 9, 2:00 PM
    • Saturday, August 8, 8:00 PM

    $10 - $20 at the door

    Advance tickets online at www.dancepalace.org for $18.50 plus $1.50 service charge.

    Brother's fight, lions die, cousins run away from home, and a girl dressed like a boy pretends to be a girl.  Shakespeare's gender-bending comedy, As You Like It, has something for everyone.
    Presented by Bread & Butter Theatre Company.

    Featuring Melissa Claire, Hunter Ridenour, Michael Keys Hall, Alex Skinner, Lauren Prentiss, Richard Gabri, Liam Blaney, Devon De Groot, Lana Palmer and Bruce Avery.
    Directed by Bruce Robert Avery.

  • Sunday, August 9, 3:00 PM

    A resident of Point Reyes Station, Lorraine Almeida has been creating art for the last fifty years. The focus that painting requires is an active form of meditation for her.
    She was committed to painting, while raising four children and with much encouragement earned an MFA  at the San Francisco Art Institute.

    She is currently am running a fine arts gallery in Marshall, CA  for the third year.  The “Art by the Bay Weekend Gallery”
    has changing exhibits of the finest work she can find. The exhibits last about two months.

    Lorraine continues to create her own paintings.

    A portion of the proceeds from the sales will benefit the Dance Palace Community & Cultural Center.

    Opens August 2, reception for the artist is Sunday, August 9 at 3 PM.

  • Saturday, August 15, 9:00 AM

    A day dedicated to sprucing up the Dance Palace.  Projects for all skill levels and ages. The Dance Palace Community Center could not run without our amazing team of volunteers and friends and it would never look so nice without everyone pitching in once a year.

  • Sunday, August 16, 2:00 PM

    Join us to celebrate the publication of Volume 6 of the West Marin Review, an award-winning literary and arts journal boasting prose, poetry, art, and original music selected from contributors from across the nation. Featured local writers include poets Erin Rodoni, Jody Farrell, and Roy Mash, writers Frances Lefkowitz, Robert Kroninger, and Elisabeth Ptak, and artists Mark Ropers and Charles Eckart. The award-winning journal is published by Point Reyes Books in collaboration with a group of professional artists, writers, and editors from West Marin.

    About West Marin Review: Founded in 2006, West Marin Review published its first volume in 2008. The publication is a collaborative effort by a dedicated team of volunteers. Local artists, writers, poets, and community members serve as reviewers for each issue. The Review received a design award from The New York Book Show in 2010.

  • Monday, August 17, 9:00 AM

    Marin JCC Pre-Schools Meeting

  • Saturday, August 22, 12:00 PM

    One class / $15 at the door, 2 classes - Zumba & Yoga $23

    Zumba Class with Efren Buzzo | open to everyone!
    A 7-10 min, non-choreographed warm-up followed by a 50 minute class set to high-energy Latin, Caribbean, and other international beats with easy-to-follow steps. Each song has 3-4 different steps with arm variations.
    It is usually a non-stop class but steps are broken-down if needed.

    Zumba class time: 12pm - 1:00pm | drop in at the door $15
    Yoga class time: 1:30pm - 2:30PM | drop in at the door$ 15
    $23 for both classes at the door.
     

  • Saturday, August 22, 7:30 PM

    $10 at Point Reyes Books or at http://ptreyesbooks.com

    What if there were a magic substance that, without your doing anything but be close to it, could make you happier at home, more successful at work, healthier in body and soul, more creative, and more compassionate? Acclaimed marine biologist and conservationist Wallace “J.” Nichols Ph.D. believes that water can do all of that. His best-selling new book, Blue Mind, combines cutting-edge neuroscience, evolutionary psychology, human biology, and eco-system analysis with compelling personal stories from top athletes, leading scientists, military veterans, and gifted artists. In conversation with best-selling multi-disciplinary writer and teacher  Jaimal Yogis whose latest book is The Fear Project and James Nestor, who wrote Deep—Freediving, Renegade Science, and What the Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves. Presented by Point Reyes Books as a benefit for Turtle Island Restoration Network. Information and tickets at ptreyesbooks.com.

September 2015

  • Saturday, September 5, 8:00 PM

    $35 general, $33 seniors, $17 children plus a $1.50 processing fee

    Please join us in support of this benefit for the  Dance Palace Community & Cultural Center and West Marin Community Services food bank by bringing a donation of canned food to the concert. There will be collection baskets at the entrances.

    George Winston returns to the Dance Palace on Saturday, September 5, a brilliant Grammy Award winning pianist with over 15 albums to his name, George Winston brings his stunning brand of solo piano back to Point Reyes. Enjoy a night of beautiful music as George plays classics spanning his 42 year career

    George Winston grew up mainly in Montana, and also spent his later formative years in Mississippi and Florida. During this time, his favorite music was instrumental rock and instrumental R&B, including Floyd Cramer, the Ventures, Booker T & The MG’s, Jimmy Smith, and many more. Inspired by R&B, jazz, Blues and rock (especially the Doors), George began playing organ in 1967. In 1971 he switched to the acoustic piano after hearing recordings from the 1920s and the 1930s by the legendary stride pianists Thomas “Fats” Waller and the late Teddy Wilson. In addition to working on stride piano, he also at this time came up with this own style of melodic instrumental music on solo piano, called folk piano. In 1972, he recorded his first solo piano album, BALLADS AND BLUES 1972, for the late guitarist John Fahey’s Takoma label.

    George is presently concentrating mainly on live performances, and this time he is touring playing solo piano concerts of the Summer Show, solo guitar concerts, solo harmonica concerts, and solo piano dances (with R&B and slow dance songs). He is also studying the playing of the great New Orleans pianists Henry Butler, James Booker, Professor Longhair, Dr. John, and Jon Cleary, and he is also working on interpreting pieces on solo piano by his favorite composers, including Vince Guaraldi, Professor Longhair, the Doors, Frank Zappa, Randy Newman, Sam Cooke, Curtis Mayfield, Laura Nyro, Al Kooper, Dr. John, Henry Butler, James Booker, Jon Cleary, Ralph Towner, Arthur Lee, Milt Jackson, John Hartford, Oliver Schroer, Taj Mahal, Philip Aaberg, and others, to play at concerts, and at his solo piano dances.

     

  • Thursday, September 17, 7:00 PM

    $10

    Come learn some wonderful folk dances that Carol Friedman learned from Sonia Dion, Cristian Florescu, Camelia and Nelutu Motoc during her recent summer folk dance trip in Romania.

  • Friday, September 25, 8:00 AM

    Marin County Free Library All Staff Day

October 2015

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)

  • Tuesday, October 6, 7:00 PM

    $30 for the workshop

    This workshop is designed to get nonprofit board members and staff actively involved by demonstrating the many ways you can fundraise, showing you how to tell your story effectively, and providing simple tools to help engage your board. Carol Friedman brings over 30 years of experience in grassroots fundraising to her work as a nonprofit consultant and fundraising trainer.

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)