Performing Arts

July 2015

  • Friday, July 10, 8:00 PM
    • Saturday, July 11, 8:00 PM
    • Sunday, July 12, 2:00 PM

    $30 general, $28 seniors & kids

    MOST HAPPY FELLA IS A MOST HAPPY MUSICAL! -- West Marin Players is producing Frank Loesser’s beloved gem of a Broadway musical.  Set in the Napa Valley around 1927, it is the endearing story of a May/December romance. All-in-all this a heartfelt love story with drama, comedy and sublime music.  Don’t miss it!

    PURCHASE TICKETS NOW! OPENING NIGHT DINNER & SHOW: The Gala admission gives you wine and appetizers, dinner, dessert and admission tickets with preferred seating--$85 opening night.

    Dates are: Friday & Saturday, July 10 & 11, 8 PM Sunday, July 12, 2 PM $30 general, $28 seniors & kids. 

    For more information go to —www.dancepalace.org or 415-663-1075

     

  • Saturday, July 18, 7:30 PM

    Tickets are $25 general admission and will be available through Brown Paper Tickets www.brownpapertickets.com

    Back by popular demand, after last summer’s riveting performance, the Lucid Art Foundation is creating a second concert at the Dance Palace Community Center in Point Reyes Station. 
    This year, the ensemble includes the addition of string instruments spinning a synergy of East and West.

October 2015

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)

  • Friday, October 2, 1:30 PM

    Cost for class is $120 plus Basic Membership $35. Scholarships are available through OLLI. For more details go to: http://www.dominican.edu/academics/osher/summer-2013-course-offerings

    Americans have long pondered the question of why Southerners—mostly non-slaveholders—were willing to break up the national compact and risk lives and fortunes in defense of their traditional way of life. In this course we will delve into the mind of the Old South in an effort to resolve that puzzle. Each week we will explore the career and philosophical outlook of a key Southern thinker. Some of these representative spokesmen were well known figures—John C. Calhoun Robert E. Lee, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and “Stonewall” Jackson were important cultural icons before the first shots were fired at Sumter. But others came from more humble backgrounds, such as Hinton Helper, a rather anomalous character who was vigorously opposed to slavery. And certainly none of our protagonists came from a more miserable background than Nat Turner, the slave leader of the bloody uprising of 1831 which shocked the white establishment. We will examine the writings of several southern women, and see how they balanced their sectional loyalties with an often uneasy relationship with the “peculiar institution". Throughout the course, we will be investigating the omnipresent significance of racial consciousness in shaping the world view of “Dixieland”. This course is taught by Mick Chantler, MA.
    October 2 – November 6, 2015, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)